020 8590 2245

Ms J L Hamill (Headteacher)
45-65 Oaks Lane, Newbury Park
Ilford, IG2 7PQ

Performing Arts

Peforming-Main

Year 7
Storytelling - What will we learn?

Story-telling – As an introduction to drama, and each other, we explore the ancient art of story-telling through drama. We encourage students to think creatively and explore their love of stories.

How will we be assessed?
  • Students are assessed on a practical performance at the end of the unit, in class. They will be assessed on their skills as story-tellers.
  • Students will be expected to create a written character study in preparation of the performance.
How can I support my child?

Encourage your child to love stories and the art of story-telling by reading with them and encouraging them to pick up books, watch appropriate quality films and see theatrical performances.


 

Pantomime - What will we learn?

Pantomime – Students are introduced to elements of European Theatre history via the British tradition of Pantomime. Students are introduced to play scripts, props and costumes and are encouraged to experiment with exaggeration, physicality and comedy.

How will we be assessed?
  • Students are assessed via a practical performance of their Pantomimes at the end of the unit in class.
  • They are assessed on their use of comedy and slapstick and their interpretation of the original Pantomime play script.
How can I support my child?
  • Often this is the first experience a child has of learning lines. Helping your child to learn lines can make the task a lot easier for them, than having to learn them on their own.
  • If there’s a pantomime on near you, and you’re able to, perhaps try and arrange a visit during the school holidays.

 

Darkwood Manor - What will we learn?

Darkwood Manor – Students are introduced to the genre of horror, with an emphasis on the creation of atmosphere and tension. Students begin to develop a broader range of performance skills with a focus on Physical Theatre

How will we be assessed?
  • Students are assessed via a practical performance of their horror pieces at the end of the unit in class.
  • Students will write a written evaluation of the effectiveness of various dramatic techniques in creating atmosphere and tension.
How can I support my child?
  • Encourage your child to develop their understanding of the genre, by exploring some children’s horror fiction.
  • Engage them in conversation about the ways atmosphere and tension are created in real life and on TV, as well as in drama.

The Tempest - What will we learn?

The Tempest – Students are provided with an introduction to Shakespeare via the dramatic exploration of this classical tale of shipwreck and magic.

How will we be assessed?
  • All students will be assigned an area of research to conduct and will be then asked to present their research back to the class. They will be assessed on the quality of their research and the quality of their presentation.
  • There will also be a practical assessment where they are assessed on their portrayal of character, inspired by the original play.
How can I support my child?
  • Some students may gain confidence for their presentation by practising it at home to an audience first, and receiving feedback.
  • Encourage your child not to be scared of Shakespeare by finding modern versions of his classic tales online. There are numerous modern and cartoon versions of his plays available on YouTube.

 

Exploration of a complete play text - What will we learn?

Exploration of a complete play text – Students are provided with an opportunity to explore a complete play looking at the way the writer creates characters and being introduced to the role of director.

How will we be assessed?
  • Students will perform a scene from the play text for assessment.
  • To secure their understanding of the role of a director, students will be required to come up with a written director’s concept for a scene from the play.
How can I support my child?
  • Helping your child to learn lines can make the task a lot easier for them, than having to learn them on their own.
  • If possible, take your child to see some live theatre. The Redbridge Drama Centre offers a range of performances for children and tickets are very reasonably priced.

 

Devised theatre - What will we learn?

Devised theatre – Students will work on creating their own piece of theatre from a given stimulus on a subject that interests them. They will gain an understanding of the importance of rehearsal and exploration in the developmental process.

How will we be assessed?
  • Students are assessed via a practical performance of their devised pieces at the end of the unit in class.
  • In order to develop the skills required at GCSE, students will be required to write a written reflection and evaluation on the success of one of their rehearsals.
How can I support my child?
  • Creativity inspires creativity. Students can watch other students devised work online to help them come up with interesting and creative ideas.

Year 8
Mask, Props & Comedy  - What will we learn?

Mask, Props & Comedy – Students are introduced to a new way of working, using props and costume as a starting point for characterisation. Students will explore comedy and the dramatic techniques associated with this.

How will we be assessed?
  • Students are assessed on a practical performance at the end of the unit, in class. They will be assessed on their use of costume, props and mask.
  • As an introduction to the style of writing required at GCSE level, students will be given a paragraph structure to use in order to complete a written evaluation of another group’s work.
How can I support my child?
  • Encourage students to watch different types of comedy; contemporary comedy but also early movie comedy such as Charlie Chaplin and Laurel and Hardy.
  • Discuss with your child, things that make them laugh. Why are they funny?

 

Greek Theatre - What will we learn?

Greek Theatre – Students are introduced to an important element of drama and theatre history via the exploration of traditional Greek Theatre. Students will be introduced to the role of the chorus and style of performance via exploration of some classic Greek Myths.

How will we be assessed?
  • All students will be assigned an area of research to conduct and will be then asked to present their research back to the class. They will be assessed on the quality of their research and the quality of their presentation.
  • There will also be a practical assessment where they are assessed on their use of traditional Greek theatre techniques.
How can I support my child?
  • Some students may gain confidence for their presentation by practising it at home to an audience first, and receiving feedback.

 

Romeo & Juliet  - What will we learn?

Romeo & Juliet - Students are provided with an introduction to Shakespeare’s classic love story. They’ll experiment with stage combat choreography and develop skills in understanding Shakespearean text.

How will we be assessed?
  • Students will be assessed via a practical performance at the end of the unit. They will be assessed on their understanding and interpretation of the original scene for performance for a contemporary audience.
How can I support my child?

Encourage your child not to be scared of Shakespeare by finding modern versions of his classic tales online. There are numerous modern and cartoon versions of his plays available on YouTube.


 

Exploration of a complete play text - Blood Brothers - What will we learn?

Exploration of a complete play text - Blood Brothers – Students are provided with an opportunity to explore a complete play looking at the way the writer creates characters, and are introduced to the role of director. To ensure a thorough exploration from the perspective of performer, director and designer, this unit of work is completed over 12 weeks, as opposed to 6.

How will we be assessed?
  • Students will perform a scene from the play text for assessment.
  • To secure their understanding of the role of a director, students will be required to come up with a written director’s concept for a scene from the play.
How can I support my child?
  • Helping your child to learn lines can make the task a lot easier for them, than having to learn them on their own.
  • If possible, take your child to see some live theatre. The Redbridge Drama Centre offers a range of performances for children and tickets are very reasonably priced.

 

Devised theatre - What will we learn?

Devised theatre – Students will work on creating their own piece of theatre from a given stimulus on a subject that interests them. They will gain an understanding of the importance of rehearsal and exploration in the developmental process.

How will we be assessed?
  • Students are assessed via a practical performance of their devised pieces at the end of the unit in class.
  • In order to develop the skills required at GCSE, students will be required to write a written reflection and evaluation on the success of one of their rehearsals.
How can I support my child?
  • Creativity inspires creativity. Students can watch other students devised work online to help them come up with interesting and creative ideas.

The Overview of the course

The course aims to provide students with a variety of dramatic skills, from the perspective of performer, director, designer and audience member. Students are provided with the skills needed to complete the qualification, but more importantly, to help set them up for the future. Confidence, pride, creativity, assertiveness, empathy, a sense of open-mindedness and a hard-work ethic are nurtured and developed via the exploration of play texts, the creation of original dramatic works and the interpretation of performance texts. Your child will learn to work independently, on a one-to-one basis, and as a participant and leader of groups of varying sizes. They will develop important, transferable skills in analysis, reflection and evaluation. All students are required to work hard, but are rewarded for their efforts with a course that it is enjoyable and affirming. Students will attend trips to the theatre and be encouraged to see as much performance art as they can outside of school. We hope our students complete their GCSEs with interests, opinions and passions that stay with them forever.

Course breakdown and assessment methods

The Drama GCSE is broken down into 3 components

Component 1 – Devising - 40% (Performance exam and written portfolio):

The creation of devised piece of theatre in groups. After a period of development and rehearsal, their pieces are performed in our impressive new Drama Studio, complete with professional lighting rig and costumes, to an invited audience of family, staff and other members of the Drama Cohort. They are examined internally and a video sent away to the exam board for moderation. In conjunction with the performance, students are required to keep a portfolio of their work which includes a reflection of the development process, all research and an evaluation.

Component 2 – Performance from Text – 20% (Performance exam):

Students perform as a character in two key scenes from the same published play text. Again, these are performed to an invited audience in our Drama Studio. These performances are assessed by a visiting examiner from Edexcel. Students support their practical performances with a written synopsis of their choices behind the characterisation from the perspective of performer. These are taken into consideration by the visiting examiner.

Component 3 – Theatre Makers in Practice – 40% (Written exam):

Section A – Bringing texts to life: In preparation for the 1hour 30 minute written exam, students will explore a play text extensively from the perspectives of performer, director and designer. They will see their visions for the play realised within the rehearsal room and explored fully practically, before putting on their own version of the play for an invited audience of family and friends in our Drama Studio.

Section B – Live Theatre Evaluation: As part of their written exam, students are asked to analyse and evaluate the effectiveness of a live theatre performance they’ve seen.

What can students do at the end of the course?

The life-skills gained within drama are highly respected among many professions including law, Human Resources, teaching, sales and recruitment, media, politics & public office and medical General Practice. A Drama GCSE provides a good first step on the ladder to any of these professions as well as obviously a career in the Performing Arts.

How can parents or carers support?

Parents can support by taking students to see as much as possible; be it theatre, free performance art on the South Bank or museums, to help them broaden their minds and views on the world. Students are required to become creative thinkers and avid researchers. Regular homework is given with this in mind and parents are asked to help ensure students are keeping on top of this. Parents are encouraged to come and see students perform as often as they are able. There will also be 2 compulsory trips to the theatre which will need to be paid for.

If you have any questions about the course, please don’t hesitate to email.

rmainwaring@oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk

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What will students learn? (Overview)
Years 7-8

 

Units of work run for up to half a term. (They will not necessarily be taught in the order stated, depending on timetabling.)

All Yr 8 students will have the opportunity to use our fully equipped music studio with our music technician for a 6-week music project, which will involve composing, performing, learning an instrument and sequencing.

 

MUSIC: KS3 OVERVIEW
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Yr 7 Intro to music/

graphic   scores

              

BLA/P/C/L       

Instruments of the orchestra

(Harry Potter)

C/L

Medieval music and

Notation

Baroque music and Pachalbel’s

Canon

L/C/P

                             

Gamelan

L

Latin

American

 
L/P

African Drumming

L/P

Intro to sibelius/

Notation

C

Ukelele

L/P

Yr 8 Programme music

C/L

Pop music

L/P

Reggae (musical futures 1)

Intro to GCSE & BTEC music
L

 The Blues

L/P

Thrillers

C/L

Musicals

L

Indian classical/

Bhangra/

L/P

Yr 8 (all) STUDIO STUDIO STUDIO STUDIO STUDIO STUDIO
P = Performing       C = Composing    L = Listening/Appraising
Year 7
Unit 1: Baseline Assessment, Introduction to Music, Graphic Scores

Students will complete their Baseline Assessment.

The Introduction to Music will introduce the elements of music using the relevant vocabulary of pitch, dynamics, tempo, texture, timbre and rhythm. Students will study and perform from 2 graphic scores, then compose and perform their own graphic scores in groups.

Unit 2: Instruments of the Orchestra/Harry Potter

Students will learn about the instruments of the orchestra through looking at and playing a variety of orchestral instruments from the string, brass, woodwind and percussion families. They will learn the main characteristics of instruments and how they are used through listening and composition based on the popular ‘Harry Potter’ theme music.

Unit 3:Medieval and Baroque/Notation/Pachalbel’s Canon

Students will learn about Medieval music and the beginnings of Music Notation, and will perform ‘Pavane for Jack Point’ as an example of music from this period. They will consolidate their learning of Notation through performing Pachalbel’s Canon, as an example of music from the Baroque period.

Unit 4:Gamelan

This topic includes learning about the Music of Indonesia and its importance  within the country’s culture. Students will listen to, and watch performances of, a variety of gamelan pieces and learn about instruments and notation within this style of music.

Students will perform Lancaran Bendrong, then compose and perform their own Lancaran piece.

Unit 5: Latin American

Continuing our tour of the world, this topic looks at rhythm and in particular its influence on the music of Latin America. Students will develop their keyboard skills through learning ‘Arriba’ and composing their own question and answer section within the piece. Students will have the opportunity to perform as part of a Samba band.

Unit 6: African Drumming

In this topic students will have the opportunity to master the basic techniques in playing the Djembe, and will perform African music as part of a Djembe ensemble. They will listen to a variety of African Drumming pieces of music, and will compose and perform their own ensemble Djembe piece.

Unit 7: Introduction to Sibelius/Notation

Students will consolidate their understanding of traditional music notation through learning to use the Sibelius software program on computers. They will learn how to input notes and will compose a Theme and Variations based on a simple piece e.g. Frere Jacques/Twinkle Twinkle Little Star.

Unit 8: Ukelele

Students will learn how to play the ukulele in this Unit. They will listen to some ukulele music and learn about the features of the ukulele. Students will learn some basic chords, and will perform in a ukelele ensemble.


 

Year 8
Unit 1: Programme Music

This topic introduces students to music which suggests images or tells a story. They will listen to a variety of programme music pieces by Dukas, Saint-Saens, and Mussorgsky and explore how music can convey ideas. Students will then compose a piece of programme music based on a picture of their choosing, and perform this piece as a duet.

Unit 2: Pop Music

Students are introduced to ‘Pop music’ through a variety of listening from the 1950’s to the present day. They learn about its common structure and are given a basic introduction to chords. They finish the unit by learning the repeated motif found in Alicia Keys ‘Fallin’ and working on an ensemble performance of the song in small groups.

Unit 3: Reggae/Musical Futures

Musical Futures is a well-documented method for students to learn music through playing instruments in groups with their peers. Our students thoroughly enjoy this aspect of their music education, and it is introduced here through the style of Reggae. Students will learn the history and musical features of Reggae, and will then learn to perform ‘3 Little Birds’ in a group, using Electric guitar, Bass, Keys, Drums and vocals.

Unit 4: The Blues

Students will learn about the development of the Blues style and will learn how to play a popular blues piece on the keyboard. Through this they will consolidate their understanding of melody, improvisation, chords and walking bass.

Unit 5: Thrillers

In this Unit, students will listen to various extracts of music from Thrillers, and will learn how to create suspenseful and dramatic music. Students will then compose their own piece of music to accompany a short film extract of The Boogeyman, which they will perform as a duet alongside the film extract.

Unit 6: Musicals

With a strong influence to musicals at KS4 , this topic enable to learn about the history of the musical from its birth to the present day. They are taken through musical history with listening and small composition and performing tasks culminating in a final performance of the iconic song ‘Let it go’ from Frozen.

Unit 7: Indian Music

Students will listen to extracts of Classical Indian music and learn about the instruments used, features of the music, and its place in the cultural life of India. They will compose a short piece based on the Bhairav Rag. Students will then be introduced to the Bhangra style of music through listening to and watching extracts using Bhangra music. They will learn how to play the popular Bhangra song ‘Bhabiye ni Bhabiye’. The unit will finish looking at Bollywood at the huge influence that music has on it.

How they will be assessed?

On entering Year 7, students will complete a Baseline Assessment, combining skills of Performing, Composing, and Listening/Appraising. During each Unit of work, students will be given continuous feedback on how to improve their work. At the conclusion of each Unit of work students will  be formally assessed in either Performing, Composing or Listening/Appraising or a combination of these skills. (The red initial in the table above indicates the strand/s in which they will be assessed for each Unit of work) Students will be given a WWW (what went well) and an EBI (even better if) target, to take forward to their next Unit of work. All listening assessments will involve listening to familiar and unfamiliar music and answering structured questions, and all assessments will use relevant music vocabulary, in preparation for Music at Key Stage 4.

How parents can support?

Parents can support their children in KS3 music in the following ways:

  • Encouraging them to listen to a wide variety of musical styles at home
  • Supporting their child in daily individual practice of an instrument if they are having instrumental lessons.
  • Ensuring their child regularly attends their instrumental lessons each week where relevant.
  • Encouraging their child to partake in school extracurricular activities within the music department.
  • Ensuring that Home Learning is completed and to a high standard.
  • Ensuring their child is fully prepared for music lessons with their own headphones and basic equipment.
  • Using www.musicteacher.com for fun music theory games and quizzes.

Exam Board: EDEXCEL
Overview of the course

The Edexcel GCSE in Music is designed to offer students the opportunity to develop their skill, knowledge and understanding in performing, composing and appraising music. It builds on and develops the integrated approach to music at Key Stage 3 of the National Curriculum. The four areas of study provide a broad range of musical styles, genres and traditions.

Students will enjoy a practical based course full of opportunities to express their own identities through the music that they choose to perform and compose. Collaborative work, including ensemble performances in school concerts and assemblies, offer students the chance to build their confidence and develop leadership skills.

Independent learning skills are an essential part of the course as students are expected to maintain regular practice on their chosen instrument, as well as develop ideas for compositions outside of lessons.

There are 3 parts to the course:
Part 1: Performing

Students will perform 1 solo piece and one ensemble piece – 30%. 

You may perform on any instrument (including voice) and in any style. However,

the combined duration of performances must be at least 4 minutes.

Part 2: Composing

Students will compose 2 pieces of music – 30%

Students will complete one free composition and one composition based on a set brief released by the exam board.

Compositions can be written for any instrument(s), including use of music technology and in any style.

Part 3: Appraising

In the final exam, students will answer questions on 8 set works from 4 areas of study set out below along with one piece of unfamiliar music - 40%.

Areas of Study

Students will listen to and study music from the following 4 areas:

Instrumental Music 1700 – 1820

  • J S Bach: 3rd Movement from Brandenburg Concerto no. 5 in D major
  • L van Beethoven: 1st Movement from Piano Sonata no. 8 in C minor ‘Pathétique’

Vocal Music

  • H Purcell: Music for a While
  • Queen: Killer Queen (from the album ‘Sheer Heart Attack’)

Music for Stage and Screen

  • S Schwartz: Defying Gravity (from the album of the cast recording of Wicked)
  • J Williams: Main title/rebel blockade runner (from the soundtrack to Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope)

Fusions

  • Afro Celt Sound System: Release (from the album ‘Volume 2: Release’)
  • Esperanza Spalding: Samba Em Preludio (from the album ‘Esperanza’)
Progression

GCSE Music is a general qualification which benefits students who wish to proceed to further education or employment.

By gaining a 9-4 in GCSE Music, students will be able to progress to AS Level Music in Year 12 and then onto A2 Level Music in Year 13. Students can then enter further education, either to study an aspect of music as a single subject or as part of a combined course. By gaining GCSE Music, employers are aware that potential employees have developed a skill as a solo and ensemble performer. Students can enter into various areas of employment within the Music and Performing Arts industry.

How can parents support?

Listen to the set works with students and ask them to explain the various musical features as studied in lessons.

Provide opportunities to listen to a wide range of music both from recording and, wherever possible, at live performances.

Encourage students to practice regularly on their instrument. Be aware of upcoming performance dates, recorded in students’ planners, and place particular emphasis on this as these dates approach.

Encourage students to accept any additional support offered, especially our coursework clinic and revision sessions.

Attend students’ performances at music concerts and productions.

NB:      One to one instrumental lessons are available at Oaks Park High School. While they would be beneficial to any student, it is not an expectation that every student must have lessons in order to take GCSE Music. Please speak to a member of the Music Dept. if you have any questions.

Exam Board: EDEXCEL
What is the BTEC Level 1 & 2 First Award?

This is a vocational course offering students the chance to develop their skills and competencies in all areas of music. The knowledge, understanding and skills learnt in studying a BTEC First will aid progression to further study and prepare learners to enter the workplace in due course. Entry-level employment opportunities in music include roles such as a musician/performer; music business; runner; roadie (backline technical support); stage crew; music promotion; retail and many more.

What will students study?

The course provides learners with opportunities to link education and the world of work in engaging, relevant and practical ways. It enables learners to enhance their English and mathematical competence in relevant applied scenarios whilst supporting learners’ development of transferable interpersonal skills. These include: working with others; problem-solving; independent study and personal learning and thinking skills.

Students will cover a range of practical topics:

  • The Music Industry
  • Managing a Music Product
  • Introducing Music Performance
  • Introducing Music Sequencing
Progression Routes

The BTEC First Award is equivalent to 1 GCSE Grade A*- E, depending on how many units students complete. Students studying the BTEC First Award will have the opportunity to progress to more advanced qualifications such as the BTEC Level 3 Subsidiary Diploma (which is equivalent to one A level).

Assessment

Assessment is through a variety of assignments completed throughout the course as well as an external examination paper based on the core units. Students are expected to work regularly outside of lesson time to ensure that assignments are thorough and accurately portray the vocational nature of the course.

Music Department Facilities

Having had Specialist Music College Status in the past has enabled us to fully equip our department with high spec instruments and technology. These facilities offers additional exciting opportunities to our BTEC Music students:

  • Access to high-specification computer programmes to aid composition and recording tasks, such as:
  1. Cubase
  2. Reason
  3. Sibelius
  • Professional quality recordings of all performances in our dedicated Recording Studio
  • Unlimited access to a range of musical instruments (drum kits, guitars, pianos, ukuleles, violins etc)
  • Vocational links with music industry
  • Individual tutorials tailored to students’ needs throughout the year
  • Access to workshops, events and master classes in and outside of school.
What can parents do to support?
  • Support your child with homework and encourage a positive attitude towards completing all assignments on time.
  • Understand that the work will have a direct impact on the levels awarded for each unit and the final BTEC course results.
  • Encourage regular (weekly) practice of chosen musical instrument.
  • Encourage your child to take part in performances and attend concerts to support them.
  • Understand that if my child is displaying any issues which maybe a cause for concern, then I will be contacted and possibly asked to attend a meeting to address any issues.

Mr P Assegai – Performing Arts, Media & Film Team Leader
passegai@oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk

Ms L Burcombe

lburcombe@oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk​

Ms S Bryan – Music Subject Leader
rmainwaring@oakspark.redbridge.sch.uk

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